Are You Bushfire Prepared?

Are your family and home at risk?

You don’t have to live in the bush to be threatened by bushfire, just close enough to be affected by burning material, embers and smoke. For Queensland residents, that can be just about anywhere.

The PREPARE.ACT.SURVIVE Bushfire Survival Plan is full of information that will help you to prepare your home and your family for bushfire season. It will assist you in making the decision to stay or to leave and will outline the steps you need to take as a result of your decision.

Please take time to sit down with your family and discuss your bushfire survival plan and what steps you will take to  PREPARE.ACT.SURVIVE. this bushfire season.

Bushfire Survival Plan

Whether you live in the city, on the urban fringe or in regional or rural Queensland, it is essential you have a Bushfire Survival Plan.

Your bushfire survival plan details how you’ll prepare and what action you will take if threatened by a bushfire. A well-prepared home has an increased chance of survival in a bushfire.

During a large-scale event, Queensland Fire and Rescue Service (QFRS) will not be able to place a fire truck at every property so it is therefore even more important to have a solid plan in place.

Click here to prepare your bushfire survive plan.

Fire Safety and You

The Rural Fire Service Queensland is committed to creating and improving the safety and resilience of Queensland Communities, however we need your help.

To improve your safety, you need to be well-informed about the dangers posed by fire in your own environment – at home, at work and at play.

Understanding fire safety, taking steps to prevent fires occurring, and acting appropriately when fires break out, will help protect you, your loved ones and your valuable possessions.

Fire Danger Ratings

Fire danger  is rated as

  • Low-moderate
  • High
  • Very High
  • Severe
  • Extreme
  • Catastrophic

Fire Danger Ratings will be used as a trigger for the level of advice and messaging to the community when a fire starts.  There will be three types of alert messages:

  1. Bushfire Advice: A fire or other emergency has started in the area however there is no immediate threat.  Advice messages will keep people informed and up to date with developments on a fire.
  2. Bushfire Watch and Act: There is a heightened level of threat, you need to be aware of your situation and take action to be prepared and protect yourself and your family.
  3. Bushfire Emergency Warning: You are in danger and need to take immediate action recommended by the fire service. Emergency Warnings, accompanied by the siren sound (State Emergency Warning Signal), will be activated to advise that you must take action immediately, you will be impacted by the fire.

Useful Links & Resources

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES)

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES)

The QFES aims to protect person, property and the environment through the delivery of emergency services, awareness programs, response capability and capacity (preparedness), and incident response and recovery for a safer Queensland.

Bushfire Warnings

 

Fire Weather Knowledge Centre (BOM)

Fire Weather Knowledge Centre (BOM)

Weather conditions influence the size, intensity, speed and predictability of bushfires and how dangerous they can be.

Queensland Fire Danger Ratings

Plan for a Bushfire emergency (ABC)Bushfire danger ratings (ABC Emergency)

During the fire season, emergency service agencies will assess the risk of fire in areas and provide a rating.

These are usually issued the afternoon before the expected conditions, but you should keep monitoring the situation in case the ratings change.

Here’s what the ratings mean and some guidelines on what action you should take.

Code Red or Catastrophic

  • Issued when conditions are considered at their worst to try and control a fire.
  • Ember attacks and spot fires could occur up to 20 kilometres ahead of the fire front.
  • Buildings aren’t expected to withstand fires burning in these conditions.
  • Fire agencies say you shouldn’t expect a fire truck to arrive and defend your property.
  • Schools and other services may close on days of this fire risk. Parks, reserves and forests may also be closed to the public.
  • It’s recommended that you avoid travelling to high-risk bushfire areas when this rating is applied.
  • Leaving high-risk areas early in the day, or even the night before, is recommended when a Code Red or Catastrophic rating is declared.

Extreme

  • Issued when conditions are extremely hot, dry and windy.
  • In these conditions if a fire takes hold it will be hard to control, unpredictable and fast-moving.
  • Spot fires are also likely to start and move quickly, coming from many directions.
  • Homes that are built to withstand a bushfire and are well prepared may provide safety, but you should only consider staying with your property if you are prepared to the highest level.
  • Fire agencies say leaving bushfire-prone areas early in the day is the safest option on days when this rating is declared.

Severe

  • Issued when conditions are hot and dry and possibly windy.
  • If a fire starts in these conditions it may be uncontrollable.
  • Fire agencies say well-prepared homes that are actively defended can provide safety from fire.
  • If you’re not prepared it’s recommended you leave bushfire-prone areas early in the day when this rating is declared.

Very high, high and low-moderate

  • Fire authorities say a fire starting on days of these conditions can most likely be controlled.
  • Properly prepared homes could provide shelter from a fire burning in these conditions.
  • If you’re not prepared for a fire, the advice is to leave early.
Australia's Bushfire Seasons

Australia’s Bushfire Seasons

Very little of our continent is free from fires. Dry spells create a high fire risk, particularly after good rain has encouraged lush growth. Even arid regions experience scrub fires in years when good wet season rains are followed by a long dry spell.

Weather systems work differently across Australia’s temperate and tropical regions. Severe bushfire conditions are influenced by a combination of these systems, but in most cases by hot, dry winds blowing from central Australia. The dry summer months are the danger time for southern Australia, while northern Australia is at risk during winter.

Source: BOM

Fire Bans and Restrictions

Fire Bans and Restrictions

Use this resource to check the drop down list below to check if there is a fire ban in place in your Local Government Area.

Camp fires, fuel stoves and barbecues

Camp fires, fuel stoves and barbecues
Camp fires are allowed in some Queensland parks and forests—it is good idea to bring a portable fuel stove or use on-site barbecues which are provided at many camping areas.

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