Learn Your Name In Morse Code Day

Learn Your Name In Morse Code Day

Revitalizing the love and recognition of this fading method of communication

Jan

11

to

Jan

11

Learn Your Name In Morse Code Day was created by someone known only as Brownielocks, and was done as part of trying to revitalize the love and recognition of this fading method of communication. While it’s no longer necessary to getting a Ham Radio License, it is still felt that it’s incredibly important to pass on, so that this versatile method of communication doesn’t disappear.

Learn Your Name in Morse Code

Use this handy translator – see you name in dost and dashes – then send it to a friend!

Morse Code Translator

For example, this is Live Life Outdoors.-.. .. …- . / .-.. .. ..-. . / — ..- – -.. — — .-. …  LISTEN

 

Morse Code was one of the most important innovations of communications the world has seen, serving as the foundation of one of the first high-speed communications networks in the world. Used for everything from semaphore communication, to flashing with lights, to drawing it out as a sort of code, and most importantly, the use of telegraphs to help transmit information across vast distances in the days before the telephone, it’s hard to understate the importance of Morse Code.

Morse Code is attributed to three different inventors, Samuel F. B. Morse, Physicist Joseph Henry, and Alfred Vail, who all worked together to produce a system of transmitting information via Electric Telegraph. As the only way they were able to transmit information was in electric pulses, there was a lot of consideration that went into deciding exactly how it was all going to play out.

The result was Morse Code, and it was intended to be a lot more efficient than it became at the time. There was a system developed in 1841 that would have allowed for Morse Code to be translated directly into letters at the receiving end, but oddly this system never caught on.

Learn more about Morse Code on Wikipedia.

Morse code is a character encoding scheme used in telecommunication that encodes text characters as standardized sequences of two different signal durations called dots and dashes or dits and dahs. Morse code is named for Samuel F. B. Morse, an inventor of the telegraph.

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