Seagrass Recovering from Cyclone Yasi

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Seagrass Recovering from Cyclone Yasi

Baby dugongs' return to Great Barrier Reef suggests vital seagrass recovering from Cyclone Yasi

Posted on 23.05.2017

An increase in the number of baby dugongs on the Great Barrier Reef suggests seagrass ecosystems are recovering well after recent flood and cyclone events.

A James Cook University report on the distribution and abundance of dugongs and turtles on the southern Great Barrier Reef, between Hinchinbrook Island and southern Queensland, showed the number of dugong calves had gone from zero per cent after Cyclone Yasi in 2011 to ten per cent of the visible population in late 2016.

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority’s (GBRMPA) Roger Beeden said the fact that dugongs are reproducing suggests their ecosystem is in better health.

“Because they have obviously found enough seagrass to sustain them and not only to sustain their growth but also to be able to reproduce,” Dr Beeden said.

“They are actually an indicator of the health of those systems as a whole, so it is really encouraging news.”

Share

FacebookTwitter

Have a story to tell or news to share?

Let us know by Submitting a News Story

Discover Queensland

Explore all of Queensland’s adventures.

Start Exploring

What's On

May

08

Adventure Therapy Aotearoa POSTPONED


Read more

May

08

Women’s Adventure Film Tour,Maryborough

The Women's Adventure Film Tour presented by Paddy Pallin is coming to the Sunshine Coast to celebrate Women's Week 2020!
Read more

May

17

Kooralbyn Valley MTB 6hr Endurance

Kooralbyn Valley MTB Endurance 6hr Enduro 10 km loop
Read more

Latest News

Outdoor activities require stricter social distancing

Suggests a new Belgian study

Read more
Closures UPDATE (April 9)

Updated information on closures and restrictions

Read more
Chalk messages and drawings on streets

Bringing hope during the coronavirus pandemic

Read more

Become a member

We welcome applications for new Community and Green Circle Members from organisations and individuals involved in the outdoors

Learn More
Tail Lights by Georgina Pratten