Weather & Tides

Weather, Wind & Tides

Queensland Weather Forecasts

Weather Wise Safety

Weather Guide for Land-based Outdoor Activities

Weather Guide for Land-based Outdoor Activities

(Downloadable PDF)

Weather is essential for the safety, comfort, and enjoyment of outdoor adventure activities. Organisers should know where to get weather information and understand what it means to safely plan and manage their activity.

This guide provides tips on how to get weather information, and a quick guide to weather hazards and warnings relevant to land-based outdoor adventure activities (such as bushwalking and camping).

Source
Bureau of Meteorology

Management of Outdoor Activities for Severe Weather ConditionsStaying Safe Outdoors in Severe Weather

Staying Safe Outdoors in Severe Weather

Spending time outdoors with the family can make for an enjoyable excursion. Whether you are at a park playing on playground equipment, hiking, bird-watching, swimming, or even just hanging out in the backyard, the fresh air can be pleasantly invigorating. However, the weather can change in an instant. You may have little warning before severe weather rolls in. Severe weather can involve thunderstorms, lightning, hail, tornadoes, flash floods, high winds, and even hurricanes. Seasonal weather may also include heat waves and blizzards. Depending on your location, you may also need to be prepared for earthquakes. With safety as a priority, it’s crucial to monitor the weather so you are prepared for any type of weather condition, especially when you are outdoors.

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Links

Bureau of MeteorologyEWN Weather Alerts

Early Warning Network

EWN is dedicated to the provision of a multi-channel weather alert system

EWN Weather Alerts – Queensland (Facebook)

Streamflow Forecasts (BOM)Marine & OceanQueensland Tide Tables

Queensland Tide Tables

The Queensland Tide Tables publication contains tidal predictions for the Queensland standard ports as well as instructions for calculating tides at many other intermediate locations. It also includes additional tidal information such as the highest tides of the year, locations of the standard ports as well as rise and set tables for the sun and moon.

Tide PredictionsCoastal Risk Australia

Coastal Risk Australia

Want to know what the Australian coastline may look like in 2100?
Coastal Risk Australia (CRA) has been created to show you what the Australian coast may look like in 2100. It is an interactive map tool designed to communicate coastal inundation associated with sea level rise to the year 2100.

MetEye

MetEye 

MetEye is able to show maps of weather observations and the official forecasts produced by the Bureau of Meteorology. This is quite different to other map based systems which often show automatically generated, computer model data. MetEye forecast maps have been adjusted by our meteorologists to better represent expected weather. See the “About MetEye” page for further information

Weatherzone QLDWeatherzone RadarWikipedia - Weather

Find all about the weather on Wikipedia

Higgins Storm Chasing

Other Weather Website Links  and Storm Safety Info courtesy of Higgins Storm Chasing

Cyclone Categories

Understanding tropical cyclone categories

Improve your understanding of tropical cyclone categories and their impacts. This video explains what the different tropical cyclones categories are, the hazards involved and the potential damage a tropical cyclone can cause. See http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone for all current tropical cyclone warnings for the Australian region.

Weather Related Articles

Severe Weather Safety at Outdoor Venues

Severe Weather Safety at Outdoor Venues

Monitoring the weather, understanding the threat and making the call to evacuate for the safety of players and fans is no easy task, and it’s one that venue managers must take seriously.

Spring has arrived! — so why do we have seasons?

Spring has arrived! — so why do we have seasons?

Spring is in the air! But only for those of us below the Tropic of Capricorn.

Only a few parts of the world experience the classic four seasons of spring, summer, autumn and winter. Many parts of the world get only two or even one. So, what’s going on?

Weather for Kids

Information for students and teachers

Information for students and teachers

There is a huge range of information on the BOM website which may help you with your studies. It will be easier for you to find the information you need if you search using words that are meteorological terms – for example, a report of the weather is called an “observation”. Have a look through the groups of information and links listed in this page. Each has a description of what you will find in that information group. You can use the glossary and weather words to help you understand some of the meteorological terms.

If you are unable to find the information you need, talk to your teacher or lecturer. You can also ask them to provide feedback to us suggesting further tips we can include to help students.

Weather (schoolatoz)

Weather

Read More

Source
www.schoolatoz.nsw.edu.au

Top 10 Rules for Storm Safety

Top 10 Rules for Storm Safety

If the lights go out, just remember these top ten rules for playing it safe during a storm.

1. Have a storm safety kit handy. You can make your own kit at home with help from a grown-up.

2. Stay inside during thunderstorms and blizzards. Lightning, wind and ice can damage power lines, making them very dangerous. It’s also important to stay off the phone and computer during a storm too.

3. Use flashlights instead of candles. Using candles during a storm is a big fire hazard.

4. Don’t open the refrigerator or freezer unless you absolutely need to. Keeping the door closed as much as possible will make the food last longer.

5. If your power goes out, have a grown-up notify the power company right away. The more calls or notifications they get, the faster they can find and fix the problem.

6. Don’t try to use a gas appliance to keep warm. Using a gas appliance the wrong way can cause deadly carbon monoxide. Bundle up in layers of clothes instead.

7. Ask a grown-up to unplug as many appliances as possible. This will help prevent damage when the power comes back on.

8. Don’t play near portable generators or heaters. This equipment is very dangerous, so stay far away.

9. Stay away from damaged or downed power lines. Even utility workers can’t tell if a power line is energized just by looking at it.

10. Remind grown-ups to watch out for power lines when they’re cleaning up outside. If power lines are running through damaged trees, call the electric company for help.

Source
Alliant Energy Kids (US)

 

Storm & Emergency Guide for Kids

Storm & Emergency Guide for Kids

If you have ever been in a storm, you know that they’re pretty scary! A storm can be loud and dark, and sometimes, they seem like they’ll never end. When a storm gets really bad, it can be an emergency situation. In an emergency, you could easily get hurt. Most of the time, a parent, teacher, or guardian is there to keep kids safe. But if you know what to do, you can be super-helpful in keeping yourself and your family safe … read more

Source
Emergency Essentials (US)

Activities

Kids Activities

These games and resources will teach children about:

  • hazards and emergencies
  • disaster preparation
  • personal safety
  • the role of emergency services.

Source
Queensland Government

Teachers Guide

Teachers Guide

A teacher’s guide to giving lessons on emergency situations and safety.

Source
www.triplezero.com.au

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