Rock Climbing

Nathan McNeil

Rock Climbing

Rock climbing is an activity in which participants climb up, down or across natural rock formations or artificial rock walls.

The goal is to reach the summit of a formation or the endpoint of a pre-defined route without falling.

Rock climbing is a physically and mentally demanding sport, one that often tests a climber’s strength, endurance, agility and balance along with mental control. It can be a dangerous sport and knowledge of proper climbing techniques and usage of specialised climbing equipment is crucial for the safe completion of routes. Because of the wide range and variety of rock formations around the world, rock climbing has been separated into several different styles and sub-disciplines:

Free
The most commonly used method to ascend climbs refers to climbs where the climber’s own physical strength and skill are relied on to accomplish the climb. Free climbing may rely on top rope belay systems, or on lead climbing to establish protection and the belay stations. Anchors, ropes and protection are used to back up the climber and are passive as opposed to active ascending aids. Subtypes of free climbing are trad climbing and sport climbing. Free climbing is generally done as “clean lead” meaning no pitons or pins are used as protection.[7]

Bouldering
Climbing on short, low routes without the use of the safety rope that is typical of most other styles. Protection, if used at all, typically consists of a cushioned bouldering pad below the route and a spotter, a person who watches from below and directs the fall of the climber away from hazardous areas. Bouldering may be an arena for intense and relatively safe competition, resulting in exceptionally high difficulty standards.

Source: Wikipedia

References

AMGA Training Videos

AMGA Training Videos

The American Mountain Guides Association (AMGA) is an educational non‐profit that is dedicated to supporting the American mountain guiding and climbing instructor community. As the leading organization of America’s most vibrant, inspiring community of climbers and skiers, the AMGA offers you cutting edge knowledge and hundreds of years of collective experience that you won’t get from any other climbing organization.

The Beginner's Guide to Rock Climbing

The Beginner’s Guide to Rock Climbing

Always wanted to go climbing, but don’t know where to start? We’re here to help, with this basic guide to climbing styles, techniques, and jargon.

Basic Climbing Lingo Explained

Basic Climbing Lingo Explained

Tied into the rope, chalking up my hands, I observe the climbing route before me to establish what is required both mentally and physically. “Do you want some beta?” asks a fellow neighbouring climber with a hopeful look on his face. Before finishing my reply, he’s off! “Ok, what you’re going to do is grab hold of those jugs get some real high feet and bust out to that crimp up left, best to have a good spot here. The crux is down low, so crank down on that crimp and go out to that high flake with the bomber side-pull, match here, smear your feet…”

If you’re just getting into rock climbing, hitting the indoor gyms or venturing outdoors with a group, you may have noticed an intriguing language thrown around. It’s English, but not the kind you know. Welcome to the world of climbing.

Climbing Dictionary

Climbing Dictionary

Rockclimbing.com already has one of the internet’s best dictionaries of climbing terminology.

Climbing Knots

Climbing Knots

Animated Knots by Grog

Better to know a knot and not need it, than need a knot and not know it.

The Seven Need-to-Know Climbing Knots

The Seven Need-to-Know Climbing Knots

There are dozens of knots that might be worth learning as a climber, but for the most part, you can get up and down any climb on Earth with just these basic, essential knots—The Figure-8 Retraced, Girth Hitch, Clove Hitch, Munter Hitch, Double Fisherman’s, Prusik and Euro Death Knot!

Rockclimbing Code of Conduct

Rockclimbing Code of Conduct

Expresses the value climbers place upon crags, and is intended to guide climber behaviour, increasing the opportunities for crags to remain open and accessible while protecting their environmental value

Rock Climbing AAS

Rock Climbing AAS

Adventure Activity Standards (AAS) are minimum, voluntary guidelines for conducting outdoor recreation activities . Designed primarily for organisations conducting outdoor recreation activities where the participants are dependent on the activity provider, they are also a useful reference for all outdoor enthusiasts.

The Living Rock: the origins of climbing in Australia

The Living Rock: the origins of climbing in Australia

This site is an archive of documents, images, interviews and other information relevant to the origins of climbing in Australia.

Climbing is the perfect outlet for focus and fitness, and I love the mentality required to stay calm during a run out climb.

Anon

Miscellaneous Resources

Helmets: A Guide for Climbers and Mountaineers

Helmets: A Guide for Climbers and Mountaineers

There aren’t many statistics available for injury reporting in climbing and
mountaineering. Reports that do exist are collected by mountain rescue teams,
and these paint a clear picture. Most injuries are to the lower leg, but the
majority of fatalities are at least partly due to head injury.

Published by the British Mountaineering Council (BMC)

Bouldering isn't just a cool workout!

Bouldering isn’t just a cool workout!


Bouldering is a great strength and fat-burning workout. Clambering over a rock-climbing wall without a harness is a lot of fun. The brightly coloured bouldering gyms make for a great Instagram photo. And as an added bonus, the sport might also be a great treatment for depression.

Harness Inspection (Petzl)

Harness Inspection (Petzl)

What to look for, why it’s a problem and what to do about it!

Outdoor Fun with Rock Climbing

Outdoor Fun with Rock Climbing

Rock-climbing appeals to many people, offering exhilarating challenges and enjoyable physical activity. Not only can you experience a rugged environment in its natural condition, but you can scale heights you may have never dreamed of conquering. With instruction and practice, people of all ages and fitness levels can rock-climb safely.


 

See QORF Green Circle Members who provide climbing activities in Discover (search ‘Rock Climbing’ in Activity)

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