“Invigorate” Playgrounds

“Invigorate” Playgrounds

“Invigorate” playgrounds to attract kids and lift activity: health expert

Posted on 05.09.2017

Australian students who could improve their health by playing outside at school are avoiding using school playgrounds because they’re bored.

Southern Cross University physical education and health expert Dr Brendon Hyndman says children and teenagers are staying away from or not using unattractive, unappealing outdoor spaces such as empty grassed areas, courts and fixed facilities that may not have changed or been updated with new activity options for months or even years.

“Evidence shows that if they’re not challenged or exposed to new and enticing facilities and equipment, students move less,” Hyndman said. “In my research, students have voiced that boredom can prompt them to misbehave, push boundaries and even become reckless to the point of injuring themselves or others.

“Secondary students have also voiced a desire for more challenging physical experiences. If they’re not given those attractive options, there can be a tendency to hang around the canteen and lounge areas.”

In a book to be released to coincide with National Health and Physical Education Day on 6 September 2017, Contemporary School Playground Strategies for Healthy Students, Hyndman suggests that strategies as simple as making available weather-appropriate uniforms and inexpensive mobile equipment such as hay bales and blocks, students could become motivated to venture into their school playgrounds, and reap the health benefits as a result.

However, students should be consulted about the features to be included in their playgrounds so the areas are developed in the best way to increase their health, wellbeing and outdoor learning, he said

Hyndman said Australian children can experience more than 4,000 recess and lunch periods during their primary schooling, presenting a large period that could be used to influence behaviour, recreational preferences and habits into secondary schooling and beyond.

“Teachers are conscious of changing educational content and their classrooms to prevent boredom, yet there isn’t the same consideration of how best to use schools’ outdoor spaces for learning – both for physical education and the broader recreational options,” he said. “This is especially important for those students who prefer not to participate in competitive sports.

“Girls, in particular, enjoy creative, imaginative and social play opportunities that can’t be fulfilled in tired, old-fashioned facilities. Innovative suggestions such as dog walking or dance programs give them opportunities to exercise and socialise.

“In addition, students say they become tired of certain facilities when their abilities have developed to such an extent that those facilities no longer challenge them or meet their movement needs.

“Thinking of opportunities in outdoor spaces for learning and engagement is the key, rather than considering playgrounds as a venue for letting off steam.”

Source
EducationHQ

 

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