Physical Activity

Golden Years by Wes Tolhurst

Physical Activity

Physical inactivity has been identified as the fourth leading risk factor globally for mortality.

Australia's Physical Activity Guidelines

This section contains links to Australia’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines including brochures, a summary fact sheet for each of the guidelines, tips and ideas for how to be physically active, as well as evidence review reports.

The Guidelines are supported by a rigorous evidence review process that considered:

  • the relationship between physical activity (including the amount, frequency, intensity and type of physical activity) and health outcome indicators, including the risk of chronic disease and obesity; and
  • the relationship between sedentary behaviour/sitting time and health outcome indicators, including the risk of chronic disease and obesity

Source
Australian Government, Department of Health

Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep Recommendations for Children (Birth to 5 years)

National Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep Recommendations for Children (Birth to 5 years)

The Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years (Birth to 5 years) show there is an important relationship between how much sleep, sedentary behaviour and physical activity young children get in a 24-hour period

Physical Activity & Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Children (5-12 years)

Australia’s Physical Activity & Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Children (5-12 years)

Being physically active is good for kids’ health, and creates opportunities for making new friends and developing physical and social skills. These Guidelines are for all children aged 5-12 years who have started school, irrespective of cultural background, gender or ability.

Physical Activity & Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Young People (13 -17 years)

Australia’s Physical Activity & Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Young People (13 -17 years)

As young people move through school, start work and become more independent, being physically active and limiting sedentary behaviour every day is not always easy, but it is possible and it is important. These guidelines are for all young people, irrespective of cultural background, gender or ability.

Physical Activity & Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Adults (18-64 years)

Australia’s Physical Activity & Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Adults (18-64 years)

Being physically active and limiting your sedentary behaviour every day is essential for health and wellbeing. These guidelines are for all adults aged 18 – 64 years, irrespective of cultural background, gender or ability.

Physical Activity Recommendations for Older Australians (65 years and older)

Physical Activity Recommendations for Older Australians (65 years and older)

Being physically active and staying fit and healthy will help you to get the most out of life, whatever your age. These recommendations are designed to help older Australians achieve sufficient physical activity for good health as they age

Make your Move – Sit Less – Be Active for Life! – A resource for Families

Make your Move – Sit Less – Be Active for Life! – A resource for Families

Provides information about the benefits of being physically active, and offers steps that you and your family can take towards better health, at any age.

Interesting Articles & Useful Resources

Aussies could walk their way to healthier hearts

Aussies could walk their way to healthier hearts

Nine in 10 Australians could reduce their risk of heart disease simply by walking as little as 15 minutes more each day, the Heart Foundation said following a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

Why Walking Is So Good for Parents, Toddlers, and the Cities Where They Live

Why Walking Is So Good for Parents, Toddlers, and the Cities Where They Live

Planning and managing cities has become one of humanity’s defining challenges, yet it is hard to know how to plan for what a city needs now and in the future at the same time. What can we measure to determine if a city is functioning well for its residents today and is likely to live up to its full potential in the long run?

One answer: The daily life of a toddler

Sustrans Active Travel Toolbox

Sustrans Active Travel Toolbox

The Sustrans Active Travel Toolbox provides guides, resources, tools and case studies to help local authorities and their partners make the case for and improve walking and cycling schemes. The toolbox is also designed to help you plan and deliver walking and cycling schemes in your local area.

Note: UK Based

Inactivity Epidemic

Inactivity Epidemic

Despite growing awareness about the importance of exercise and a nationwide campaign to ‘move more and sit less‘, almost 60 per cent of Australian adults are still not doing enough physical activity.

A new study published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, comparing National Health Survey data over 20 years, found that we have not improved our activity levels since 1989

Running on a High

Running on a High

Sporting or physical recreation event participation can affect different domains of mental and social well-being if sufficiently frequent, yet previous research has focused mainly on the physical health benefits of single-location or infrequent mass-participation events. We examined overall and domain specific subjective well-being of adult participants of “parkrun”, a weekly, community-based, highly accessible and widespread running event.

Benefits of Exercise

Benefits of Exercise

Running

The health benefits of regular exercise and physical activity are hard to ignore.  You know exercise is good for you, but do you know how good? From boosting your mood to improving your sex life, find out how exercise can improve your life

Physical Activity Guidelines

Physical Activity Guidelines

Key Messages

  1. Governments have a central role in providing evidence-based guidelines for health and lifestyle enhancing physical activity across all age-groups.
  2. Governments and stakeholders can use physical activity guidelines to shape policy and implement relevant strategies.
  3. The total economic cost of physical inactivity to the Australian economy is substantial, it consists of increased health care costs, lost productivity, and premature mortality.
  4. The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued a global strategy on physical activity, advocating a mixture of ‘top-down’ and community-based actions.

Source
Clearinghouse for Sport

Be Active Every Day

Be Active Every Day

Many Australian adults aren’t active enough to get health benefits. Are you one of them?

How much activity to aim for

We support Australia’s physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines. They recommend for adults:

  • Any physical activity is better than none. It’s fine to start with a little, and build up.
  • Be active on most, preferably all, days every week.
  • Aim to accumulate 2.5 to 5 hours of moderate intensity physical activity or 1.25 to 2.5 hours of vigorous intensity physical activity each week.
  • Do muscle strengthening activities on at least 2 days each week

Source
Heart Foundation

Active Transport

Active Transport

Walking and cycling are popular activities that can take many different forms, including: leisure-time activity, exercise and fitness, recreation, sport, and walking or cycling used as a mode of transport. Active transport refers to unassisted travel (walking) or non-motorised (bicycle) transportation with an intended destination. There is a great deal of overlap or synergy between walking and cycling used as active transport and similar activity intended for social, recreational, and health outcomes.

Active transport has many demonstrated benefits – personal (health and fitness), social (community connectivity), environmental (reduced carbon footprint) and economic (infrastructure costs).


Key Messages

  1. Walking and cycling used as a mode of transport can contribute to personal health and fitness objectives.
  2. Engaging in active transport can have positive economic, environmental and social outcomes.
  3. Active transport is one of the most effective means of increasing levels of physical activity within a community.

Source
Clearinghouse for Sport

Australia's Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines

Australia’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines

This page contains Australia’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines including links to brochures, a summary fact sheet for each of the guidelines, tips and ideas for how to be physically active, as well as evidence review reports.

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