Physical Activity

Golden Years by Wes Tolhurst

Physical Activity

Physical inactivity has been identified as the fourth leading risk factor globally for mortality.

Physical Literacy

Sport Australia has released a Physical Literacy Position Statement to support our nation’s health.

Broadly and enthusiastically endorsed by sporting organisations, physical activity providers and education bodies, the Position Statement is a commitment to help all Australians, especially our children, bring out their best through physical activity.

QORF endorses Physical Literacy Position Statement

The QORF Management Committee has voted to formally endorse the Sport Australia Position Statement on Physical Literacy. … At QORF, we believe that physical literacy is important for all Australians. Everybody, and most especially young people, deserve the benefits that follow on from increased physical activity – fitness, healthier lifestyles, time spent outdoors, improved social skills and much more. Read More

Sport Australia is committed to improving the lives of all Australians through sport and physical activity. We want more Australians moving more often because we know the enormous benefits to our health and wellbeing – physically, socially, psychologically and cognitively.

Download the Physical Literacy Position Statement

Read More
  1. Statistics show eight in 10 Australian children are not active enough and Sport Australia CEO Kate Palmer said it was especially crucial to help children develop physical literacy – the skills, knowledge and behaviours needed for healthy lives.

“Physical literacy is far bigger than just teaching our children how to play sport, it’s about putting them on the path to healthier, happier and more active lives,” Palmer said.

“You don’t give a young child a book and expect them to understand it confidently without first teaching them how to read, so why can’t we place a greater emphasis on teaching every child to be active, which is a fundamental skill that will benefit them every day, for the rest of their lives?

“Society often talks about the role of physical activity in combating health issues like obesity, which is true, but there’s so much more to be gained by teaching our kids the necessary skills to be active, including improvement to mental health. That means things like helping kids learn better in school, building their confidence, self-esteem and motivation, helping them form social connections and friendships, plus boosting their strategic and critical thinking skills.

“Physically literacy is about holistic development – physically, psychologically, socially and cognitively.

“The Australian Government has set a goal in the national sport plan to decrease physical inactivity by 15 per cent by 2030, and so improving physical literacy in children is vital. The quality of life for this generation and for future generations depends on it.”

The Position Statement complements Sport Australia’s release earlier this year of The Australian Physical Literacy Framework.

For more information on The Australian Physical Literacy Framework and to access the Sport Australia Position Statement on Physical Literacy visit www.sportaus.gov.au/physical_literacy

See also: Children losing physical literacy

Australia's Physical Activity Guidelines

This section contains links to Australia’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines including brochures, a summary fact sheet for each of the guidelines, tips and ideas for how to be physically active, as well as evidence review reports.

The Guidelines are supported by a rigorous evidence review process that considered:

  • the relationship between physical activity (including the amount, frequency, intensity and type of physical activity) and health outcome indicators, including the risk of chronic disease and obesity; and
  • the relationship between sedentary behaviour/sitting time and health outcome indicators, including the risk of chronic disease and obesity

Source
Australian Government, Department of Health

Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep Recommendations for Children (Birth to 5 years)

National Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep Recommendations for Children (Birth to 5 years)

The Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years (Birth to 5 years) show there is an important relationship between how much sleep, sedentary behaviour and physical activity young children get in a 24-hour period

Physical Activity & Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Children (5-12 years)

Australia’s Physical Activity & Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Children (5-12 years)

Being physically active is good for kids’ health, and creates opportunities for making new friends and developing physical and social skills. These Guidelines are for all children aged 5-12 years who have started school, irrespective of cultural background, gender or ability.

Physical Activity & Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Young People (13 -17 years)

Australia’s Physical Activity & Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Young People (13 -17 years)

As young people move through school, start work and become more independent, being physically active and limiting sedentary behaviour every day is not always easy, but it is possible and it is important. These guidelines are for all young people, irrespective of cultural background, gender or ability.

Physical Activity & Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Adults (18-64 years)

Australia’s Physical Activity & Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Adults (18-64 years)

Being physically active and limiting your sedentary behaviour every day is essential for health and wellbeing. These guidelines are for all adults aged 18 – 64 years, irrespective of cultural background, gender or ability.

Physical Activity Recommendations for Older Australians (65 years and older)

Physical Activity Recommendations for Older Australians (65 years and older)

Being physically active and staying fit and healthy will help you to get the most out of life, whatever your age. These recommendations are designed to help older Australians achieve sufficient physical activity for good health as they age

Make your Move – Sit Less – Be Active for Life! – A resource for Families

Make your Move – Sit Less – Be Active for Life! – A resource for Families

Provides information about the benefits of being physically active, and offers steps that you and your family can take towards better health, at any age.

Blueprint for an Active Australia

Getting more Australians active will help prevent heart disease

Heart disease is Australia’s leading cause of death. While there are many contributing factors to this across lifestyle, diet, family history and more,not being active is a major contributor to the burden of heart disease.

In fact, physical inactivity leads to over 20 per cent of the burden of heart and blood vessel disease in Australia.  Read More

Getting more Australians active will help to prevent and manage the pain, discomfort, costs and loss of livelihoods and, indeed, the loss of life that comes from heart disease, Australia’s biggest killer.

That’s why the Heart Foundation is calling on the Australian Government to fund the development and implementation of a National Physical Activity Action Plan. This national plan will provide funding and support for implementing the recommendations in this blueprint; it’s an investment in the heart health of all Australians.

Developed by the Heart Foundation – dedicated to making a real difference to the heart health of Australians.

      

Interesting Articles & Useful Resources

Canada's ParticipACTION Pulse Report

Having trouble getting off the couch?

Can’t find friends to go hiking with, or time to go to the gym?
You’re not alone.

According to Statistics Canada, only 16% of Canadian adults are getting the recommended amount of physical activity (150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per week). That means 84% of the adult population is not active enough. To find out why, ParticipACTION decided to take the pulse of physical activity in Canada.
READ MORE

7 Facts about the Physical Activity “Pulse” in Canada

  1. Canadians know physical inactivity is a problem.
  2. Canadians are aware people need to be more active.
  3. Canadians have positive feelings about being active.
  4. Canadians think that a more active life is within reach.
  5. Canadians think everyone contributes to the physical inactivity problem.
  6. Canadians think individuals are at the heart of the issue.
  7. Canadians support public policy to encourage increased physical activity.
    Read Report / Infographic

See also:
1. Impact Report 2018-19 (ParticipACTION)
2. Sport and Physical Activity for Girls and Women (Canada)

Physical activity at any intensity linked to lower risk of early death

Physical activity at any intensity linked to lower risk of early death

A multi-national team of researchers, including authors from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre (BRC), have produced clear evidence that higher levels of physical activity—regardless of intensity—are associated with a lower risk of early death in middle aged and older people.
Read More

Source:

Medical Press

Good cardiovascular health in midlife linked to lower risk of dementia later

Good cardiovascular health in midlife linked to lower risk of dementia later

It has been known for some time that what is good for your heart is good for your brain. But understanding how, and to what extent, your cardiovascular health might affect your risk of developing dementia is tremendously complex.

A study published on August 7, 2019 in the BMJ has found adults with good cardiovascular health at the age of 50 have lower rates of dementia later in life.

Read Full Story

Economic, Social and Health Impacts of Sport and Active Recreation in Queensland

Economic, Social and Health Impacts of Sport and Active Recreation in Queensland

Sport and active recreation provide large benefits to Queenslanders, through various economic and social channels. Total economic and social benefits are estimated to be in the order of $18 billion, an amount equivalent to around 5% of Gross State Product (GSP).

The sport and active recreation sector directly and indirectly supports economic activity and jobs across Queensland. Sport and active recreation are estimated to make an economic contribution of around $5 billion per annum, or nearly 1½ % of GSP.

The development of the Comprehensive Analysis of Policy on Physical Activity (CAPPA) framework

The development of the Comprehensive Analysis of Policy on Physical Activity (CAPPA) framework

Introduction
Policy analysis is considered essential for achieving successful reforms in health promotion and public health. The only framework for physical activity (PA) policy analysis was developed at a time when the field of PA policy research was in its early stages. PA policy research has since grown, and our understanding of what elements need to be included in a comprehensive analysis of PA policy is now more refined. This study developed a new conceptual framework for PA policy analysis–the Comprehensive Analysis of Policy on Physical Activity(CAPPA) framework.

Read Full Article

Physical Activity: Every bit counts

Physical Activity: Every bit counts

Tips on staying active this winter

Is the colder weather freezing you in place when you should be keeping active?

Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered: download our free e-book packed with tips for staying active this winter. We’ll let you know how much physical activity you need, some simple tips to get started and how to set yourself up to succeed.

Get ready to get fit, get active, and get heart-healthy!

Taking part with disabled people: Non-disabled people's perceptions

Taking part with disabled people: Non-disabled people’s perceptions

A new report from the Activity Alliance in the UK shines a light on non-disabled people’s attitudes on inclusive activity with disabled people.

Recommendations

  • Increase public awareness of disabled people, especially in relation to being active. This must aim to challenge perceptions and create a more accurate and diverse picture of active disabled people among their non-disabled peers.
  • Embed inclusivity in many more opportunities so disabled and non-disabled people can be active together.
  • Celebrate and share experiences of inclusive activity with representation for all impairment groups.

Read More

No time to exercise?

No time to exercise?

Have you recently carried heavy shopping bags up a few flights of stairs? Or run the last 100 metres to the station to catch your train?

If you have, you may have unknowingly been doing a style of exercise called high-intensity incidental physical activity  … incorporating more high-intensity activity into our daily routines — whether that’s by vacuuming the carpet with vigour or walking uphill to buy your lunch — could be the key to helping all of us get some high-quality exercise each day. Read More

Healthy Active by Design

Healthy Active by Design

The Heart Foundation has, since 1959, been fighting the single biggest killer of Australians – heart disease. Almost 1.5 million of us live with heart disease and each year more than 55,000 Australians suffer a heart attack.

One of the key ways of improving heart health is to increase physical activity levels – and we know that improving the design of our cities, towns, streets and buildings makes it easier for Australians to lead heart-healthy lives.

Alongside its internationally recognised research, the Heart Foundation also advocates for environmental and behavioural changes to provide all Australians with opportunities to be healthy and active throughout their lives in the places they live, study, work and play.

Few Australians Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines

Few Australians Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines

A new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIWH) reveals that, across all ages, few Australians meet recommended physical activity guidelines.

Physical activity across the life stages shows that, overall, only 30% of children aged between two and 17 years and 44% of adults meet guidelines that call for adults aged between 18 to 64 years to undertake at least 150 minutes of activity a week over five sessions and children/youth aged five to 17 years to be active for at least 60 minutes per day.

Aussies could walk their way to healthier hearts

Aussies could walk their way to healthier hearts

Nine in 10 Australians could reduce their risk of heart disease simply by walking as little as 15 minutes more each day, the Heart Foundation said following a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

Why Walking Is So Good for Parents, Toddlers, and the Cities Where They Live

Why Walking Is So Good for Parents, Toddlers, and the Cities Where They Live

Planning and managing cities has become one of humanity’s defining challenges, yet it is hard to know how to plan for what a city needs now and in the future at the same time. What can we measure to determine if a city is functioning well for its residents today and is likely to live up to its full potential in the long run?

One answer: The daily life of a toddler

Sustrans Active Travel Toolbox

Sustrans Active Travel Toolbox

The Sustrans Active Travel Toolbox provides guides, resources, tools and case studies to help local authorities and their partners make the case for and improve walking and cycling schemes. The toolbox is also designed to help you plan and deliver walking and cycling schemes in your local area.

Note: UK Based

Inactivity Epidemic

Inactivity Epidemic

Despite growing awareness about the importance of exercise and a nationwide campaign to ‘move more and sit less‘, almost 60 per cent of Australian adults are still not doing enough physical activity.

A new study published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, comparing National Health Survey data over 20 years, found that we have not improved our activity levels since 1989

Running on a High

Running on a High

Sporting or physical recreation event participation can affect different domains of mental and social well-being if sufficiently frequent, yet previous research has focused mainly on the physical health benefits of single-location or infrequent mass-participation events. We examined overall and domain specific subjective well-being of adult participants of “parkrun”, a weekly, community-based, highly accessible and widespread running event.

Benefits of Exercise

Benefits of Exercise

Running

The health benefits of regular exercise and physical activity are hard to ignore.  You know exercise is good for you, but do you know how good? From boosting your mood to improving your sex life, find out how exercise can improve your life

Physical Activity Guidelines

Physical Activity Guidelines

Key Messages

  1. Governments have a central role in providing evidence-based guidelines for health and lifestyle enhancing physical activity across all age-groups.
  2. Governments and stakeholders can use physical activity guidelines to shape policy and implement relevant strategies.
  3. The total economic cost of physical inactivity to the Australian economy is substantial, it consists of increased health care costs, lost productivity, and premature mortality.
  4. The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued a global strategy on physical activity, advocating a mixture of ‘top-down’ and community-based actions.

Source
Clearinghouse for Sport

Be Active Every Day

Be Active Every Day

Many Australian adults aren’t active enough to get health benefits. Are you one of them?

How much activity to aim for

We support Australia’s physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines. They recommend for adults:

  • Any physical activity is better than none. It’s fine to start with a little, and build up.
  • Be active on most, preferably all, days every week.
  • Aim to accumulate 2.5 to 5 hours of moderate intensity physical activity or 1.25 to 2.5 hours of vigorous intensity physical activity each week.
  • Do muscle strengthening activities on at least 2 days each week

Source
Heart Foundation

Active Transport

Active Transport

Walking and cycling are popular activities that can take many different forms, including: leisure-time activity, exercise and fitness, recreation, sport, and walking or cycling used as a mode of transport. Active transport refers to unassisted travel (walking) or non-motorised (bicycle) transportation with an intended destination. There is a great deal of overlap or synergy between walking and cycling used as active transport and similar activity intended for social, recreational, and health outcomes.

Active transport has many demonstrated benefits – personal (health and fitness), social (community connectivity), environmental (reduced carbon footprint) and economic (infrastructure costs).


Key Messages

  1. Walking and cycling used as a mode of transport can contribute to personal health and fitness objectives.
  2. Engaging in active transport can have positive economic, environmental and social outcomes.
  3. Active transport is one of the most effective means of increasing levels of physical activity within a community.

Source
Clearinghouse for Sport

Australia's Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines

Australia’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines

This page contains Australia’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines including links to brochures, a summary fact sheet for each of the guidelines, tips and ideas for how to be physically active, as well as evidence review reports.

Become a member

QORF welcomes applications for new Community and Green Circle Members from organisations and individuals involved in the outdoors

Learn More
Tail Lights by Georgina Pratten