Activity Specific

Activity Specific Research

Research  on specific outdoor activity issues

Cycling

Cycling

Research, reports and publications on the developing importance of cycling to our future

Horse Trail Riding

Horse Trail Riding

Research and Reports on the Impacts of  Horse Trail Riding

Trail Bike Riding

Trail Bike Riding

Trail bike riding is a legitimate outdoor recreation activity with increasing demand.

Recreational trail bike usage, particularly in bushland areas near private residences, presents a range of interrelated problems for participants, adjoining landholders, Local Governments and State Government agencies in Queensland and elsewhere in Australia.

Mountain Biking

Mountain Biking

Mountain Biking (MTB) is an outdoor recreation activity that is experiencing an increase in participation numbers. A relatively “new” activity, this increase in participation brings with it a raft of issues.

Rock Climbing

Rock Climbing

Research, reports and publications on the development of rock climbing

Bushwalking

Bushwalking

This SportAus Ausplay Bushwalking State of Play Report has been designed to deliver a single sport snapshot, to help identify trends and opportunities to maximise participation and engagement.

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Key Take Outs

Overall Participation

  • The annual population estimate for Adults 15+ participating in Bush Walking was 1,174,049 (or 5.8% of the Adult 15+ population).
  • Adult participation was very gender balanced with 576,132 men (or 5.8% of the male population) and 597,918 women (or 5.9% of the female population) taking part in Bush Walking. This represents an almost equal (49%/51%) gender split in overall participation.
  • Bush Walking was most popular in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) (10.6% of the ACT Adult 15+ population participated in Bush Walking) and Tasmania (10.2%).
  • Interestingly, participation in Bush Walking was significantly higher in major cities (5.9%) and inner/outer regional areas (6.2%) compared to remote and very remote locations (3.9%).
  • Not surprisingly, only 11% of Bush Walking participation was organised.
  • Unlike recreational Walking, which showed peak participation rates at later stages of life (55+), peak participation rates for Bush Walking was at 25-34 years of age for women (7.8%). Men’s participation was similarly high at the same age (6.5%) but peaked at 55-64 years of age (7.7%).

Frequency & Duration

  • Adults 15+ who participated in Bush Walking had a median frequency of 12 sessions per annum (about once per month) and the median session duration was 180 minutes.

Motivations for Participation (Adults 15+)

  • The main motivations to participate in Bush Walking were ‘Fun/enjoyment’ (35%), ‘To be outdoors/to enjoy nature’ (34%) and ‘Physical health or fitness’ (32%).
  • ‘Social reasons’ were also a motivator by just less than one in five (18%) participants.
  • ‘To be outdoors/enjoy nature’ was clearly the dominant motive for younger participants.
  • ‘Fun/enjoyment’ is slightly more prevalent at middle age and
  • ‘Physical health/fitness’ becomes the primary motivation for older Bush Walkers aged 65+.

Reasons For Dropping Out of Participation

  • The dominant reason for dropping out of Bush Walking participation was ‘Poor health or injury’ (25%) but other notable reasons were ‘Don’t like it’ (16%) and ‘Not a priority anymore’ (14%).

Growth & Opportunities

  • Net growth market opportunity is average to low
Walking

Walking

This SportAus Ausplay Walking State of Play Report has been designed to deliver a single sport snapshot, to help identify trends and opportunities to maximise participation and engagement.

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Tail Lights by Georgina Pratten