Easing of Restrictions

Return to Play

Back to COVID-19: News and Updates

Guide for Queensland sport, recreation and fitness industries

This evening, the Queensland Government released a Queensland Return to Play webpage (www.covid19.qld.gov.au/returntoplay), with a series of sub-pages, and valuable resources, including “Return to Play – Guide for Queensland sport, recreation and fitness industries”.

Check out the Return to Play Readiness checklist to check whether your organisation’s activities can restart.

Some key points from the Guide:

Purpose of this Guide – This information is a regularly updated guide for returning to play for fitness, sport and active recreation peak bodies, individuals, organisations and clubs impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions across Queensland. It sets out key considerations that should be taken into account when restrictions start to lift, including a Return to Play Readiness Checklist to assist in this process.

The Guide reiterates the National principles for the resumption of sport and recreation activities, taken from the AIS Framework for Rebooting Sport in a COVID-19 Environment”, and references the OCA Framework for Rebooting Outdoor Activities in a CIVID-19 Environment” and Fitness Australia’s “Re-opening Considerations of Fitness Facilities in Australia”

The Guide specifically states that “Before re-opening, organisations and businesses delivering sport, recreation and fitness activities must consider how to meet physical distancing and hygiene obligations at the relevant stages.”

QORF recommends that all Queensland outdoor organisations, commercial and non-profit, should become familiar with the resources, and follow the guidance contained within. A key task is completing an updated Safety Management Plan for your operations, documenting and displaying relevant parts of that plan. Information on WHS planning for the outdoor sector is available on the QORF website here.

Outdoor operators are well aware that the best safety management system is useless if it isn’t clearly communicated to and followed by all workers – paid and unpaid. All workers involved in your operations need to be trained on changes to the safety management system and in any additional identified risks and control measures. If you are introducing additional controls, training is required. For example, for any extra personal protective equipment that is required for your activity, workers need to know where it will be kept and how to use it. Consider how you will document all training.

The Queensland Government web resources provide more information in a readily accessible manner. QORF salutes the large amount of work that has been done with the outdoor sector by the Queensland Government, particularly Sport and Recreation within the Department of Housing and Public Works, in a very tight timeframe, since the announcement on Friday 8th May 2020 of the “Roadmap to easing Queensland’s restrictions”.

QORF will continue to work with the Queensland Government to clarify the return to play for outdoor operators across the State. If you have questions or comments, please contact us.

Discretion is the better part of valour

QORF urges all outdoor organisations to take time to consider when your organisation will genuinely be in a position to “Return to Play”. This is not a decision that should be rushed into – just because some restrictions lift as of Saturday 16th May, that does not mean that all eligible organisations will be ready to do so. If you are not ready, and have further queries that we could help with, please contact us.

Links

Previous/related articles

Guidelines for the Resumption of Mountain Bike Activities in a COVID-19 Environment (MTBA)

Guidelines for the Resumption of Mountain Bike Activities
in a COVID-19 Environment

As the nation moves towards a relaxing of COVID-19 restrictions for sport and active recreation, Mountain Bike Australia (MTBA) have developed
Guidelines for the Resumption of Mountain Bike Activities in a COVID-19 Environment (the MTBA Guidelines) to assist clubs and members with the
resumption of mountain bike activities. The MTBA Guidelines address key elements within the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) Framework for Rebooting
Sport in a COVID-19 Environment (the AIS Framework) and the Outdoor Council of Australia Framework for Rebooting Outdoor Activities in a COVID-19
Environment (the OCA Framework), and the National Principles outlined in each.

It is important to note the MTBA Guidelines must be read in conjunction with the AIS and/or OCA Framework and decisions about resumption of mountain
bike activities must take place with careful reference to the National Principles therein and following close consultation with Federal, State/Territory and/or
Local Public Health Authorities, as relevant.

Read/Download 

 

Return to Play

Guide for Queensland sport, recreation and fitness industries

This evening, the Queensland Government released a Queensland Return to Play webpage (www.covid19.qld.gov.au/returntoplay), with a series of sub-pages, and valuable resources, including “Return to Play – Guide for Queensland sport, recreation and fitness industries”.

Check out the Return to Play Readiness checklist to check whether your organisation’s activities can restart.

Some key points from the Guide:

Purpose of this Guide – This information is a regularly updated guide for returning to play for fitness, sport and active recreation peak bodies, individuals, organisations and clubs impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions across Queensland. It sets out key considerations that should be taken into account when restrictions start to lift, including a Return to Play Readiness Checklist to assist in this process.

The Guide reiterates the National principles for the resumption of sport and recreation activities, taken from the AIS Framework for Rebooting Sport in a COVID-19 Environment”, and references the OCA Framework for Rebooting Outdoor Activities in a CIVID-19 Environment” and Fitness Australia’s “Re-opening Considerations of Fitness Facilities in Australia”

The Guide specifically states that “Before re-opening, organisations and businesses delivering sport, recreation and fitness activities must consider how to meet physical distancing and hygiene obligations at the relevant stages.”

QORF recommends that all Queensland outdoor organisations, commercial and non-profit, should become familiar with the resources, and follow the guidance contained within. A key task is completing an updated Safety Management Plan for your operations, documenting and displaying relevant parts of that plan. Information on WHS planning for the outdoor sector is available on the QORF website here.

Outdoor operators are well aware that the best safety management system is useless if it isn’t clearly communicated to and followed by all workers – paid and unpaid. All workers involved in your operations need to be trained on changes to the safety management system and in any additional identified risks and control measures. If you are introducing additional controls, training is required. For example, for any extra personal protective equipment that is required for your activity, workers need to know where it will be kept and how to use it. Consider how you will document all training.

The Queensland Government web resources provide more information in a readily accessible manner. QORF salutes the large amount of work that has been done with the outdoor sector by the Queensland Government, particularly Sport and Recreation within the Department of Housing and Public Works, in a very tight timeframe, since the announcement on Friday 8th May 2020 of the “Roadmap to easing Queensland’s restrictions”.

QORF will continue to work with the Queensland Government to clarify the return to play for outdoor operators across the State. If you have questions or comments, please contact us.

Discretion is the better part of valour

QORF urges all outdoor organisations to take time to consider when your organisation will genuinely be in a position to “Return to Play”. This is not a decision that should be rushed into – just because some restrictions lift as of Saturday 16th May, that does not mean that all eligible organisations will be ready to do so. If you are not ready, and have further queries that we could help with, please contact us.

Links

Easing of Restrictions: A staged approach.

Download Fact Sheet

Updates for the Queensland Recreation Sector

Outdoor recreation plays an integral role in keeping Queenslanders fit and active.

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected our ability to enjoy the outdoors and over the next few months, there will be opportunities to re-introduce physical activity in our communities.

Change is coming for Queenslanders

Following on from the National Cabinet meeting on 8 May, the Queensland Government will provide a staged approach to phase in sport and recreation over the coming months. We will work hard to help community sporting and outdoor activity clubs and organisations restart, while also keeping Queenslanders healthy and safe.

The Queensland Government has established the Return to Play Advisory Sub-Committee to provide advice on the best ways to reintroduce sport and continue with active recreation for the whole community.

To get back into organised physical activity, we need to build on the progress we have already made – listen to the health advice, maintain a safe distance from others and keep up good hygiene.

Before re-opening, physical activity organisations and businesses must demonstrate their ability to meet physical distancing and hygiene obligations at the relevant stages. Peak bodies will provide guidance around incorporating COVID Planning into WHS Planning, and will lead the development of COVID-SAFE plans for industry (where COVID-SAFE Plans are required).

For more information, reach out to SR_Covid19@npsr.qld.gov.au or call 3330 6166

  1. What does Stage 1 of the Roadmap mean for individuals who want to undertake their favourite outdoor (non-contact) activities?
    Stage 1 means that groups of up to ten people are allowed to undertake outdoor non-contact activities, rather than the previous restriction of one household plus one other person. Also, the distance of travel under Stage 1 has increased from 50km to 150km (and to 500km within the Outback if you live in the Outback).Stage 1 expands on the range of outdoor activities allowed from having a picnic and going fishing, boating or jet-skiing to hiking and other recreational activities in national and state parks. All Queenslanders must comply with physical distancing, good hygiene measures and avoid going out if unwell.
  2. When will parks, playground equipment, skate parks and outdoor gyms be available for use?
    Parks, playground equipment, skate parks and outdoor gyms may be re-opened under Stage 1, however it will be up to the councils and other organisations that manage those facilities to re-open these.
  3. Can we go camping during Stage 1?
    No. Camping is not allowed until Stage 2, which will not commence until after 12 June 2020, at the earliest. Assuming the review indicates that restrictions can be further eased.Under Stage 2, camping is allowed with certain limits in place. More information will be available in the coming weeks.
  4. Can we go swimming at our favourite swimming spot during Stage 1?
    Recreational activities are allowed in pools (indoor and outdoor), public spaces, lagoons (such as South Bank Parklands, Cairns and Airlie Beach) and national parks/state forests. It will be up to the responsible site manager (e.g. councils, QPWS, Seqwater, SunWater) to re-open swimming areas and other locations.This is expected to be done on a case by case basis, depending on the risk profile of various locations across the State.The following rules are applicable when swimming in pools:

    • one person per lane per lap swimming
    • a maximum of 10 swimmers per pool
    • no spectators, except for up to one parent/carer per child, if necessary
    • communal showers and change rooms are closed, toilets may remain open
    • minimise the use of communal facilities
    • shower with soap before and after swimming (at home, not at the pool)

    You should consider what precautions are required when swimming in lakes, rivers, creeks and at the beach.

  5. If I am at a park and there are already 10 people in total and someone else arrives and won’t adhere to the rules what should I do?
    You can attend the park if there are already 10 people, however you must distance yourself and your group from other groups.Gatherings in public spaces must be limited to a maximum of 10 people within one group. You are not permitted to organise mass gatherings in a public space.We also still encourage you to use common sense when attending small public gatherings and if a park, or any other outdoor public space is over-crowded, go somewhere else. We ask that Queenslanders use common sense and good judgement, including maintaining plenty of distance between groups.Things to think about when deciding if a park is already too crowded include:

    • Is there plenty of distance between each group (can you play ball between each group; can you talk easily without overhearing another group)?
    • Is there an empty space for your group to sit comfortably that is still a good distance from others?
    • Is there somewhere less crowded we can go to, that isn’t far from here to be on the safe side?

    It is up to landowners to monitor public spaces and communal areas such as entry and exit points, carparks, toilets and barbeques to determine if levels of activity and participation are safe.

  6. Does Stage 1 of the Roadmap include organised outdoor non-contact activities (e.g. organised by businesses or community organisations)?
    Stage 1 of the Roadmap allows personal trainers to operate while maintaining social distancing requirements.It also permits the use of pools (indoor and outdoor), public spaces and lagoons, parks, playgrounds, skate parks and outdoor gyms; and hiking and other recreational activities in national and state parks
  7. Does every organisation that is able to operate under Stage 1 of the Roadmap need a COVID SAFE Plan?
    All businesses in Queensland have obligations and responsibilities under Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) legislation. Every organisation must comply with all relevant Queensland Health Directives. For example:

    • Home Confinement, Movement and Gathering Direction (No. 4)
    • Non-Essential Business, Activity and Undertaking Closure Direction (No.9)

    Including social distancing and hygiene measures, logging of participants, and encouraging the use of the Federal Government’s COVID SAFE App.

    Up to date information on the ‘Framework for COVID SAFE Businesses’ and supporting information can be found at https://www.covid19.qld.gov.au/government-actions/roadmap-to-easing-queenslands-restrictions

  8. Stage 1 commences from 11.59pm Friday 15th May – does my organisation have to re-commence operating on Saturday 16th May?
    No. It is up to each operator to decide when they will recommence operations as long as their operations align with the directives of Public Health Directives.The Queensland Government supports the resumption of outdoor activities and recognises the contribution of the outdoor sector to our economy, however during this time the priority is that every Queenslander takes the appropriate measures to limit and reduce the spread of COVID-19.You may need time to plan how you will manage your activities. You may need time to implement your plan and acquire additional equipment. You may need time to train your staff (paid and volunteer) in new protocols.If you are not comfortable or ready to resume outdoor activities this coming weekend, then you should hold off until you are ready.
  9. Will the physical size and scope of the venue be considered in whether group activities can take place in a certain location?
    The Queensland Government approach at Stage 1 is to reduce opportunities for people to congregate, including in carparks and other common areas, to reduce the chances of spread of COVID-19.Where the physical characteristics of the venue mean that it is impossible or impractical to maintain physical distancing, appropriate hygiene measures, and/or keeping track of participants, then that venue should be avoided for outdoor activities. Potential choke points, such as a single boat ramp on a peninsula, should be avoided.Where a venue accommodates the required conditions, such as by having multiple entrances/exits that allow groups to dissipate across the landscape, then outdoor activities may be undertaken at that site, although this would be subject to ongoing review. For example, if a venue becomes over-crowded during the day then physical distancing may no longer be practical, and outdoor activities may need to be discontinued.
  10. Would there be different expectations for an organisation operating on private property compared to an organisation operating on public land?
    No, all requirements of the Roadmap and the Queensland Health Directives apply, as outlined at https://www.covid19.qld.gov.au.
  11. What should be included in a COVID Safe Plan?
    Up to date information can be found at https://www.covid19.qld.gov.au/government-actions/roadmap-to-easing-queenslands-restrictions.

 

Download Fact Sheet: UPDATE ON RETURN TO PLAY

Further guidance can be sought from QORF at info@qorf.org.au

Disclaimer

The information on this page has been taken from credible sources and is shared with the best of intentions. While we have have done our best to provide the most up to date information, we cannot take responsibility for any person or organisation suffering as a result of using the information shared on this page. It is the responsibility of all organisations to do their research, to comply with all relevant legislation and to be aware of current government advice.

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