Protecting Yourself and Others

Protecting Yourself and Others

Back to COVID-19: News and Updates

Protecting Yourself and Others

How to protect yourself against COVID-19

Social Distancing

How do I do social distancing?

Click to download Australian Government Info Sheet

Information on Social Distancing 

While practising social distancing, you can still go to work or school and use public transport to get around.

But you should aim to stay 1.5 metres away from other people while social distancing — no mean feat if you’re on a packed bus or train.

That’s why health authorities have admitted it cannot be practised in all situations, despite how effective that would be to stem the flow of cases.

There is no need to live off canned goods for the duration of social distancing — trips to the grocery store are fine, as long as you keep your distance from fellow shoppers and make it a quick trip.

The World Health Organisation says you do not need to wear a mask if you are not displaying any symptoms.

People who are practising social distancing should avoid enclosed areas like family gatherings, weddings or even drinks at the pub with your friends.

You should also avoid physical interaction, including shaking hands, hugging or kissing, as the virus can be spread via droplets from close interaction between people.

Self Isolation - staying at home

Self Isolation – staying at home

Click to download Australian Government Info Sheet:

Isolation Guidance

The NZ Ministry of Health defines self-isolation as “staying away from situations where you could infect other people”. Specifically, it means any situation where you may come in close contact with others.

Staying home is a precautionary measure to protect those around you – your family, friends, colleagues – from possibly contracting COVID-19. Self-isolation is an effective measure of prevention. Take simple, common-sense steps to avoid close contact with other people as much as possible, like you would with the seasonal flu virus.

  • As much as possible, you should limit your contact with people other than the family members.
  • You should avoid having visitors to your home, but it is okay for friends, family or delivery drivers to drop off food and supplies.
  • Minimise close contact with others on your home by avoiding situations where you have face-to-face contact closer than 2 metres for more than 15 minutes.
  • You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, pillows or other items with other people in your home. After using these items, you should wash them thoroughly with soap and water, place them in the dishwasher for cleaning or wash them in your washing machine.
  • Use your own toothbrushes, eating and drinking utensils (including cups and glasses in the bathroom and bedroom), dishes, towels, washcloths or bed linen. Do not share food and drinks. Someone in your home can prepare your food, but you should not prepare food for others. Wash your clothing and dishes separate to others in your home.
  • If you have a garden, it is fine to do gardening as you aren’t in close contact with other members of your household.
  • You should not be sharing a bed with others. You may need to speak with your family about sleeping arrangements. You should avoid sleeping in a common area during the 14 day period.
  • Minimise the time you spend in shared spaces such as bathrooms, kitchens and sitting rooms as much as possible and keep shared spaces well ventilated. Clean surfaces after you use them and try to avoid touching them after you have cleaned them. This means areas like kitchen benches and sinktops.
  • Make sure you use separate towels from other people in your house, both for drying yourself after bathing or showering and for hand-hygiene purposes. Ask your family or the people you live with to remember to use their own towels.
  • If you use a shared toilet and bathroom, it’s important that you clean them after you have used them every time (for example, wiping surfaces you have come into contact with). You may wish to be the last to use the shower/bath in the morning or evening to make this easier on those you live with. You should use your own toilet paper, toothpaste and other supplies during your stay at home.
  • If you share a kitchen with others, avoid using it while others are present. Take your meals back to your room to eat. It may be easier for someone else in your household to prepare your food and you avoid the kitchen area. If you have one, use a dishwasher to clean and dry your used crockery and cutlery. If this is not possible, wash them using your usual washing up liquid and warm water and dry them thoroughly, remembering to use a separate tea towel.

Don’t have visitors in your home

Don’t invite or allow social visitors, such as friends and family, to enter your home. If you want to speak to someone who is not a member of your household, use the phone or other means of contact.

Laundry

Do not shake dirty laundry; this minimises the possibility of dispersing virus through the air. It may be easier for someone else to fold and put away common laundry items (such as towels and tea towels) and provide a supply for you. You should fold and put away your own laundry items.

Things you can do to make it easier

Staying at home may present its own challenges, but there are things you can do to make the 14 days easier.

  • plan ahead and think about what you need to be able to stay at home for the full 14 days
  • talk to your employer, friends and family to ask for their help to access the things you will need in advance
  • talk to your employer to see if you can work from home during this time
  • think about and plan how you can get access to food and other supplies such as medications
  • if you need supplies while you are staying at home, ask friends or family to drop off anything you need or you can order supplies online. Make sure any deliveries are left outside your home for you to collect.
  • you can keep in touch with friends and family over the phone, through or other means of contact
  • physical exercise is good for your wellbeing. Look for online classes or courses to help you take light exercise in your home
  • you can go outside, but you need to limit your contact with others
  • don’t use public transport, taxis or similar transport methods during your 14 day period. You can only use public transport after you arrive in New Zealand for the sole purpose of returning to your home, but cannot use it after that. You can use your own transport means (car, bike etc) whenever you wish
  • you can live with others during your 14 days, but you need to avoid close contact with them. This also means don’t share beds, linen or food
  • aim to stay in a well-ventilated room with a window that can be opened. Try to keep the window open as much as possible to enable ventilation and airflow as this will help to keep clean air moving through your room
Non-Essential Indoor Gatherings

NON-ESSENTIAL INDOOR GATHERINGS OF 100 PERSONS OR MORE

The purpose of this Part is to prohibit non-essential indoor gatherings of 100 persons or more.
Directions

  1. A person who owns, controls or operates premises in the State of Queensland must not allow a non-essential indoor gathering of 100 persons or more to occur on the premises from the time of publication of this direction until the end of the declared public health emergency.
  2. A person must not organise a non-essential indoor gathering of 100 persons or more on premises in the State of Queensland from the time of publication of this direction until the end of the declared public health emergency.
  3. A person must not attend a non-essential indoor gathering of 100 persons or more on premises in the State of Queensland from the time of publication of this direction until the end of the declared public health emergency.

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Source: Queensland Health

Mass Gatherings

ON-ESSENTIAL MASS GATHERINGS OF 500 PERSONS OR MORE

The purpose of this Part is to prohibit non-essential mass gatherings of 500 persons or more.

Directions

  1. A person who owns, controls or operates premises in the State of Queensland must not allow a non-essential mass gathering of 500 persons or more to occur on the premises from the time of publication of this direction until the end of the declared public health emergency.
  2. A person must not organise a non-essential mass gathering of 500 persons or more on premises in the State of Queensland from the time of publication of this direction until the end of the declared public health emergency.
  3. A person must not attend a non-essential mass gathering of 500 persons or more on premises in the State of Queensland from the time of publication of this direction until the end of the declared public health emergency.

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Source: Queensland Health

Good Hygiene Starts Here

WHO Handwashing Technique

WHO How to handrub (using alcohol based sanitisers)

Namaste, Leg Shake & Elbow Bump: Coronavirus Greeting Etiquette

Disclaimer

The information on this page has been taken from credible sources and is shared with the best of intentions. While we have have done our best to provide the most up to date information, we cannot take responsibility for any person or organisation suffering as a result of using the information shared on this page. It is the responsibility of all organisations to do their research, to comply with all relevant legislation and to be aware of current government advice.

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